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dc.contributor.authorRodríguez Salas, Gerardo
dc.contributor.editorEdiciones Universidad de Valladolid
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T15:06:21Z
dc.date.available2016-06-22T15:06:21Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationES: Revista de filología inglesa, 2005, N.26, pags.201-212
dc.identifier.issn0210-9689
dc.identifier.urihttp://uvadoc.uva.es/handle/10324/17322
dc.description.abstractThe present article departs from the concept of "mimicry" or "masquerade", theorised by such feminist critics as Joan Riviere (1929), Luce Irigaray (1985), or Mary Ann Doane (1991). This implies that women deliberately assume the feminine style and posture assigned to them within patriarchal discourse with a subversive rather than merely imitative intention by means of what Gerard Genette calls "saturation". In particular, this study focuses on Katherine Mansfield's satire of gender stereotypes in Germany. Through this mimicry, Mansfield aims to prove that such stereotypes go beyond national boundaries and affect the people of different countries similarly-in this case Germany and England. The selected texts are two short stories included within her early collection In a German Pension (1911): "The Modem Soul" and "Germans at Meat".
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isospa
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceES: Revista de filología inglesa
dc.subjectFilología Inglesa
dc.title"Germany is the home of the family": a criticism of gender roles in Katherine Mansfield's "In a German Pension"
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.publicationfirstpage201
dc.identifier.publicationissue26
dc.identifier.publicationlastpage212
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International


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