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dc.contributor.authorÁlvarez Calleja, María Antonia
dc.contributor.editorEdiciones Universidad de Valladolid
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T15:28:41Z
dc.date.available2016-06-22T15:28:41Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationES: Revista de filología inglesa, 2006, N.27, pags.7-22
dc.identifier.issn0210-9689
dc.identifier.urihttp://uvadoc.uva.es/handle/10324/17325
dc.description.abstractSince World War II British and American writers, disenchanted with tradition, have created works that reject the boundaries set forth by those traditions. They see the modern world so fragmented and chaotic that it can no longer be described by the ordered conventions. But if contemporary fiction is apocalyptic and disruptive, its comic treatment of violence has produced a complex tone in which the comic vision is used to suggest hope. Two of the truly gifted writers in the so-called black humor, or comic treatment of violence, are the American John Hawkes and the British Beryl Bainbridge. The comic mode in their novel s is closely related to the centrality of death, and this combination explains the attraction-repulsion antithesis of our response to their major characters.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isospa
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceES: Revista de filología inglesa
dc.subjectFilología Inglesa
dc.titleConexiones Literarias Interculturales: Tratamiento Cómico de la Violencia en Beryl Bainbridge y John Hawkes
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.publicationfirstpage7
dc.identifier.publicationissue27
dc.identifier.publicationlastpage22
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International


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