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dc.contributor.authorDinger, Bruce
dc.contributor.authorGonzález, Constancio
dc.contributor.authorYoshizaki, Katsuaki
dc.contributor.authorFidone, Salvatore
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-30T16:12:19Z
dc.date.available2014-10-30T16:12:19Z
dc.date.issued1981
dc.identifier.citationBrain Research, 1981, n. 205. p. 187-193es
dc.identifier.issn0006-8993es
dc.identifier.urihttp://uvadoc.uva.es/handle/10324/6847
dc.descriptionProducción Científicaes
dc.description.abstractThe carotid body is an arterial chemosensory organ which detects changes in blood gas tensions and pH, and reflexly contributes to the cardiorespiratory adjustments which occur during hypoxia, hypercapnia and acidosis. However, the sensory mechanisms involved in carotid chemoreception remain to be elucidated. Morphologically, the carotid body consists of an association of elemental units, or glomeruli, within a connective tissue stroma penetrated by a dense capillary net 5. The glomeruli are comprised of catecholamine-rich type I, or chief cells, which are enveloped by glial-like processes of type II, or sustentacular, cellsa,4,19. Sensory fibers from the carotid sinus nerve penetrate the glomeruli to terminate in synaptic-like apposition on type I cellst,18, 21.es
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfes
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherElsevieres
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectNeurofisiologíaes
dc.titleAlpha-bungarotoxin binding in cat carotid bodyes
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.identifier.publicationfirstpage187es
dc.identifier.publicationissue205es
dc.identifier.publicationlastpage193es
dc.identifier.publicationtitleBrain Researches
dc.peerreviewedSIes
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International


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